Video games=Art?

Oct 19, 2013 by

Are video games art?  This is a controversial topic because everyone differs in how they can define art.  Like art, games are designed to entertain people with their creative expression and their form. I think that video games are art because they have a long history and they relate to the culture of the time which it was made in. It also influences people to do different things and makes them think. When I first played the game “The Marriage,” I thought this game was so simple with its plain graphics. The game looks very easy to complete but I think it was deliberately designed this way to portray how difficult marriage can be. Ian Bogost on Serious Games talked about his son playing the game Animal Crossing. He claimed that this game promotes...

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“Passage” a guide to life!...

Oct 17, 2013 by

          Critics have finally started to take video games seriously as an art form. However video-games is such a vague word, so what qualifies as art and what is their just for entertainment. The market today continues to be saturated by first-person shooters and action games, but alongside such conventional releases, independent designers are experimenting with affordable and free games that enlighten a players senses. However despite steps being taken by artist to develop these works of art, their are still literary critics who are trying to impede the steps  forward that video-games are making. One such critic is Roger Ebert, he was an American, literary film critic, journalist and screenwriter. Roger Ebert described his critical style as, “as relative, not absolute; he reviewed a film for what he felt would be its prospective audience,...

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Art and Games, can the two be used in the same sentence ?...

Oct 14, 2013 by

The question posed in Ian Bogost’s article, “How to do things with videogames” is asking whether video games can be considered art or not. In my personal opinion it can, whether it’s through visual, audio, or even comedy, I think video games can certainly fit those criteria’s. Whether or not video games can be universally accepted as art by everyone is a battle that may never come to an end. When it comes to art, everyone argues about everything relating to art, so to try and stick the “this is art” label on video-games will likely never happen just because of the nature of people and their acceptance of new art forms. But it certainly can be accepted as art by the audience and what they decide is or isn’t art. The art-game “The...

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Video Games as Art

Oct 14, 2013 by

The definition of art can be thrown around, stretched, pushed and prodded. I had never considered video games to be art. Upon first playing The Marriage I was extremely confused because every time I clicked or pressed an arrow the game restarted. I read the rules and played again, having more success than the first couple times. After reading the meaning of the game, written by the maker, the game made much more sense. Each square represents one half of the marriage, which was pretty obvious. The size of the squares represents their egos and the circles are outside elements that could affect a relationship. The player is trying to make the marriage work or last a long time. Each square, or person in the couple, has different rules which makes the game is...

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Games and Art? huh

Oct 14, 2013 by

The Marriage was probably the weirdest game I have ever played. Like every stereotypical male, I decided it was a good idea to start the game without reading the instructions. That sure did not help because the game kept on restarting. Then I found out you were not suppose to click anything. Moral of story…..READ THE INSTRUCTIONS! Back to the game, it took me awhile to understand why this game might be classify as “art”. At first, I thought it was the colors and shapes that made it art, but after playing it over a couple of times I realized why it might be classify as one. The game is so simple, yet so complex at the same time as how the game might be for the audience to develop their own story through...

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